House Lockout

House Lockout

Did you briefly step outside of your house for a minute to get the mail, and then the door shut behind you locking you out? Or did your key just fell off of your key ring? Did you find yourself stuck outside with no way of getting back into your own home? It's so frustrating, we know! Regardless of how it happened, call a local professional locksmith in Denver today to get you back into your home.

Perhaps your child or an elderly loved one is even locked in and requires immediate intervention, or you simply need access back into your own home.  At Locksmith Denver, we perfectly understand all a house lockout entails. We rate lockout services an emergency and would desire to remedy that situation you are in immediately.

What to Do in a House Lockout Situation?

There are various ways to regain access to your home or business. Locks have various levels of security and Locksmith Denver; a professional locksmith company near you is ready to help you with whichever type of security you have; whether low, medium, or high-security knobs or deadbolts. We have different tools and methods to be used for any type of house lockout.

Not only can we help you with the house lockout, but we are also able to install, change and re-key the locks, too.  We can change the pin settings in your lock and produce new keys if you wish to keep the current locks in your home or business. Your existing keys will no longer work after. If you've lost your keys, we can also change your locks completely. You can pick high, medium, or low-security locks, and whether a bronze, gold, silver finish, and we will change them out for you. You can also purchase your own locks. We perform fresh installations as well if you want to add a lock. Not only do we work with regular locks, but we also work with hardware like electronic locks, magnetic locks, and panic bars for your business. 

First Time You’re Locked Out?

If this is your first time getting locked out of your home, you don’t need to worry. Locksmith Denver is available to help you out at all hours of the day or night. All you need to do is call, and a certified locksmith will come on over and help you out. If you are locked out of your house or apartment late at night and you are worried about waiting outside alone, you can always call the police and let them know that you are locked out and need their assistance. In the case of emergencies, such as being locked out while there’s a child stuck inside on her own, the police can even break through your front door or window as a last resort.

Not the First Time You're Locked Out? Take Preventative Measures!

You don’t want to be dishing out dollar after dollar of your hard-earned money for something as avoidable as a house lockout. If this has been happening for a while now, it's time to take preventive measures.

If you find yourself locked out of your home and you want to ensure that it won’t happen again if you can help it, there are several things you can do to help yourself. Firstly, you could ask us to make a duplicate set of keys. By leaving a spare set of keys by a trusted neighbor or friend, you can relax knowing that even if you do lock yourself out of your home again, you won’t be stuck. You can also choose to hide your extra key somewhere on your property. If you do decide to stash your house key somewhere, do it intelligently. Leaving an extra key under your front door mat or in your mailbox is just silly; as it will be the first place a burglar will look for it, so get creative!

If you are not comfortable with leaving your key by a neighbor, and you don’t want it lying about your property, we at Locksmith Denver can install a combination lock or a keyless entry system on your front or back door. You can also do this if you have children living at home who constantly lose their keys and you want to rectify the situation for once and for all. These systems are ideal for houses where many people live under one roof because it will eliminate the need for having a bunch of keys circling throughout the city and everyone who needs to will have a way of getting into your home easily.

Please, give us a call on (303) 749-0505, if you have any questions regarding house lockout, car lockout, office lockout, installations, changing or re-keying, and we will be ready to help you feel more secure in your home or business.

How To Find A Reliable Locksmith - Locksmith Denver

How to Find a Reliable Locksmith

5 Things to Know Before Hiring a Locksmith

When you find yourself locked out of your house or car, have lost your keys, or have need to hire a reliable locksmith, there are a few things you need to know before you contact the first available one. The five things to know before hiring a locksmith include gathering recommendations from those you trust, checking for third-party approval, doing your homework, knowing how to spot fraud, and always hiring locally. Let’s discuss each point in more detail so when the time comes for you to hire a reliable locksmith, you will know what to do.

1) Gather Recommendations from those you Trust

Getting recommendations from those you trust is one of the best ways to hire a professional. Some call this word-of-mouth advertising, and it’s truly one of the most trusted ways to be assured you are contacting the best for hire. This is especially true when it comes to hiring someone to work with your keys and locks that you rely on to keep you, your family, and possibly your business and employees, safe and secure. Quality locksmith professionals tend to not only show up during an emergency but also stick around to build strong, lasting business relationships with their clients. Start by asking neighbors, friends or family members you already trust who they have had work for them with their locksmith needs and whether or not they would recommend these companies. Also, consider contacting local real estate agents in the area who have worked closely with the best area professionals and can give a solid recommendation.

2) Check Third-Party Approvals

Third-Party simply means verifying that the company and their technicians are known by and have a good reputation in their field based upon an opinion other than what they claim in their advertising and preferably from a reputable oversight organization. Receiving the approval of a reputable third party ensures that they have already been approved and vetted with oversight from a trusted source. Often, this means that they have obtained proper certifications, are up to date on testing and exams that prove competency of knowledge, or are bonded and insured giving them more credibility.

A good place to start your research is at a website called Associated Locksmiths of America (ALOA) another good third-party site is Findalocksmith.com, which is a website backed by ALOA. Search for the locksmith’s company name, search by location, or find the kind of service you need. It is important that you go to the third-party site to verify any claims the individual professional states in their advertising is true.

3) Do your Homework

Do your homework well before hiring someone to work on your locks, keys, or security systems. Do your best to research the company enough to be assured that the locksmith has good safe technician skills, and always make sure to verify their credentials. Expect to be asked to show proper identification when the expert arrives. A legitimate and trustworthy professional will possess a valid state locksmith license and registration. Don’t be afraid to ask for this before allowing any work to be done. Also, look for the technician to show up in a clearly marked vehicle.

4) Spot Fraud

Know how to spot fraud before you hire a locksmith. It’s easier than you may think to be deceived. Not everything you see on the internet or in an advertisement is the truth. Before you trust your security to the first company that makes remarkable claims, verify that they are who they say they are and that they are a legitimate professional business. When you call, listen closely to how they answer the phone. If you don’t hear the company’s name stated, start to ask questions or end the conversation and call another company until you are confident the company you hire is legitimate and trustworthy.

5) Hire Local

Finally, these two short and simple words make a huge difference. Verify that the company is truly local and not just a technician being dispatched from a national call center. The first problem with using a national call center that you probably were deceived into believing was local, is that the locksmith may not know your local area and may take longer to show up, but that’s just the beginning of potential risks. These technicians may claim they are local only because they may live and work in the area, but the company who sent them to do the job is not a local company. Rather, the locksmith has been subcontracted to get the work done which means the cost may be higher than working with a locally licensed business. It also means that a complete background check or verification process may not have been fully implemented in regards to the technician working on your locks. Obviously, time is not always on your side to allow for this, but the best way to verify a company who claims to be local is, in fact, local is to visit their storefront before you need their services.

An Extra Word of Advice

Another helpful piece of advice when hiring a dependable locksmith is knowing that a true professional will be able to do a lot more than simply show up during a house or car key or lock emergency to get you out of a jam. A trained expert will also be able to help you out with cutting or programming keys on the spot, helping with safe locks or file cabinet locks, or setting you up with a new set of locks when you move into a new place. Before you call for help, understand what specific services your needs pertain to and then look for a local locksmith who specializes in that area of expertise.

Are you in need of a dependable, knowledgeable, trained expert locksmith technician in the Denver area? Call us now at (303) 749-0505. We look forward to serving your lock and key needs.

 

What Is A Master Key System?

A master key system allows one key to open several locks. Those who are authorized have access to different doors within a system. A master key system allows security with as few keys as possible. The system is easy to use with only one key needed and simplified organization.

Most master key systems operate with a basic pin tumbler lock. To open this kind of lock, the pin stack, which consists of a driver pin and a key pin, must be elevated on opposite sides of the shear line. A key lifts the pins within the lock. The key pins are all different sizes. The driver pins are a universal size. The key has to have the right set of grooves to lift the key pins to the proper height. To convert a pin tumbler lock into a master key system, a master wafer pin is added between a driver and key pin. Once it is inserted, the pin stack will have two shear lines – one for the pin stack and one above or below the line for the master key.

Master key systems can be basic or very complex. The most basic master key system has two levels of keying. The lower level keys are called change keys. Each change key operates only one lock or one group of like keyed locks. They key at the top is known as the master key.  Within the master key system, one key may open two doors while another key only opens one of those doors and not the other. In order from lowest level to highest,

The master key system keys are as follows:

Change Key – Sometimes this key is called the sub-master key. It opens only one lock or locks that are identical. The lock that the change key opens can also be opened by the master key or, in more complex systems, the grand master key, or the great grand master key.

Master Key – In the most basic system, the master key is the top level key. It opens every lock of the change keys below it.

Grand Master Key – In a slightly more complex system, the grand master key will open every master key lock within the master key system as well as all of the subsequent change keys.

Great Grand Master Key – In the most complex master key systems, there is a great grand master key. This key will open all of the grand master key, master key systems and change locks beneath it.

The first step is to determine the size of the master key system. Considering:

  • Compose an organizational chart to determine who the current users are and existing needs.
  • Determine future requirements, up to a 10-year life of a master key system
  • Think about employee turnover rate through friendly and not-so-friendly terminations of employment
  • Think about the potential for increasing staff size
  • Think about what to do in the case of lost keys
  • Determine what type of locks your master key system will open
  • Expand an existing master key system.

Master Key System DenverBasic pin tumbler locks within the master key system are able to be made more secure by adding sidebars, using master rings, implementing restricted keys, employing multiple cylinders, using electronic controls, disk detainer locks, or use separate master key systems for different work groups or locks on separate parts of the building. Qualified locksmith technicians will know which ones best meet your needs.

When you are ready to install a master key system at your place of business, contact a local, professional commercial locksmith who will be able to walk you through the best master key system for your company's needs as well as secure your locks to prevent security risks with the master key system.

Panic Hardware - Locksmith Denver

When Is Panic Hardware required On exit Doors

Feeling secure and relying on your door locks to keep you safe inside is a good feeling unless of course, you are in a room full of people and there is an emergency that leaves a potentially panicked mass stampede of those all trying to find a way to exit the building at once. This is the moment you will be thankful that your facility adhered to the legal requirements and recommendations to install panic hardware on their egress, exit, doors to make it easier for everyone to get out safely.

When is panic hardware required on exit doors?

Panic hardware is installed and used on doors as an exit device. It is usually only installed on doors that are required by law to have panic hardware. International Building Code IBC only requires this type of hardware on buildings:

with specific high-traffic or high-hazard occupancy, such as educational or assembly facilities with more than 50 people.

Some examples of high-hazard facilities include rooms that run equipment with more than 600 volts or more than 800 amps, boiler, incinerator, refrigeration machinery, or furnace rooms as well as some electrical rooms.

The idea behind panic hardware is to allow a way out of the building in the case of an emergency. Panic hardware cannot be used on a fire door because of the danger of trapping people inside during a fire.

Sometimes, panic hardware is called fire exit hardware, or they may be referred to as egress doors. Basically, if a door doesn’t have a lock with a push/pull or a latch, the door is not legally required to need panic hardware. Though, just because you may not be required by code to install panic hardware on your door, you still have the option to do so.

If your building is required by code to have panic hardware in place, you will need to understand what all this entails. The type of hardware you use is important.

Some key features to keep in mind:

  • The actuating portion of the exit device needs to be at least half the width of the actual door.
  • It should not require more than 15 pounds of force to unlatch it.
  • You should never add a chain lock, padlock, an extra deadbolt, or any electric latches or components that would delay the opening of an egress panic hardware equipped door.
  • If you use a touch pad, it must never extend more than half the width of the door, starting from the side with the latch.
  • Depending on your location, your panic hardware may be required to meet testing standards to withstand a tornado or hurricane.

One common characteristic of most panic hardware is that it has a dogging feature. These dogging features allow the latches to be held in a retracted position in order to create a push/pull function. When the device is dogged, it is unlatched or unlocked, and you will be able to pull the door open.

When selecting the panic hardware for your doors, you have several options and styles, but three are the most common and include the

The touch pad the most common style for modern buildings. Flexible when an electrified option is required.

Touchpad Style Panic Hardware Denver Experts Locksmith

The crossbar usually will be used for glass doors, but the electrified options are limited because of the lack of space.

The Crossbar Denver Experts Locksmith

Recessed panic hardware will require a cut out in the door but will reduce the projection of the hardware from the door.

Recessed Exit Device Denver Experts Locksmith

There are a couple of types to use depending on whether you have one door or a pair. These types include Rim or Mortise. The Rim device is mounted on the surface of the door, whereas the Mortise is installed inside the door with the panic hardware mounted on the face of the door. There are also Vertical Rod/Cable or Multi-Point options. The Vertical Rod/Cable style is usually used on pairs of doors. The Multi-Point combines vertical rods with a Rim device to allow 3-point latching. Once you decide on the functionality of your panic hardware, you will be able to select from trims, controls, and a variety of finishes. In some cases, you can also choose to add Electric Latch Retraction ELR.

Not all buildings are required to have these type of exit devices, but some choose to install them regardless for safety sake. These legal requirements are often revised, but you can always stay up to date by first referring to the latest information provided by The Life Safety Code NFPA 101 as well as the International Building Code IBC.

The panic hardware requirements vary depending upon the year and other factors:

  • 2006 and 2009 IBC requires panic hardware on egress doors in educational and other buildings with 50 or more occupants.
  • 2000 and 2003 IBC requires panic hardware on egress doors in educational and other buildings with 100 or more occupants.
  • NFPA 101 is the Life Safety Code encompasses high hazard occupancies with 100 occupants or more.

 

Are you looking to install panic hardware on your doors? For more information, give us a call 24/7 at (303) 749-0505 today. We will be happy to help serve your door hardware requirement needs.